Michel Platini: UEFA president ‘optimistic’ of overturning six-year ban

first_img Michel Platini 1 UEFA president Michel Platini expressed his optimism of overturning his six-year ban from all football-related activity, as his Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) appeal began in Lausanne.Platini and Sepp Blatter were punished in December over a 2million Swiss francs (£1.3million) “disloyal payment” made to the Frenchman by the former FIFA president.They were given eight-year suspensions which were reduced by two years in recognition of their services to the game, but both deny any wrongdoing and are challenging the bans in Switzerland.Arriving for the CAS hearing, Platini was quoted by the website of French radio station RTL as saying: “Today it is the start of the match – a new match, a final – and we are all on the same line.“I am optimistic, we will win.Blatter’s appeal against his six-year ban will be heard at a later date.But the 80-year-old former FIFA president attended the hearing to give evidence about the payment he approved for Platini in 2011 as backdated, uncontracted salary.“I was interviewed as a witness of FIFA, I answered questions from FIFA, from the representatives of Mr Platini, and I answered questions from the (CAS) panel,” Blatter was quoted as saying by RTL.“I hope I have given important information in this case, which is of interest to me. I hope my participation helps in finding a solution to this problem.“I found the atmosphere very fair, very correct, and I leave this meeting with a calm conscience.”The verdict on Platini’s case is expected sometime next week.UEFA will be keenly awaiting the outcome as it has delayed presidential elections until Platini’s case is concluded.Angel Maria Villar has been named as UEFA’s acting president, while Gianni Infantino has succeeded Blatter as FIFA president.Platini has already been invited to this summer’s European Championships in France, but the ban from football-related activity would not allow him to attend the tournament in any capacity which could appear official.last_img read more

CoRank Relaunches: Create Your Own Digg

first_imgWhen CoRank launched in March it was a social news ranking site (like Digg) that filtered news based on your sources — people whose opinion you value. Or, as CoRank founder Rogelio Bernal Andreo told us, it was “yet another boring bookmarking site.” Today, the site relaunched with a new focus: allowing users to create their own, branded social news and bookmarking site based on CoRank’s technology using a set of simple online tools.Rogelio, who is also the founder of eGrupos, one of the largest Spanish-speaking social networks on the web, said that a trial run of the new CoRank on the Spanish version revealed some demand for this type of build-your-own-digg service (Rumoreame is an example of a customized CoRank running on the Spanish language version that is getting some use). Related Posts Creating a site on CoRank is a simple 3 step process. Choose a name and subdomain, enter a description, choose a design and set up your categories. After your site is set up, you can change any of the settings you chose during sign up, or access the HTML and CSS for real customization of its look and feel. You can monetize your creation using Google Adsense. CoRank’s customization and management tools are all very easy to use (they passed the difficult “Can Josh understand them?” test).Is It Worth It?It may seem fruitless to try competing with Digg, but I think that because of CoRank’s twist, which attempts to eliminate the mob from social news voting, there is an opportunity for tighter social networking as a result. CoRank offers its users a “Like Minded” feature, which gives you statistics on the 50 users who are most like you based on voting and submission. Tags:#news#web 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… I think this presents an opportunity for CoRank to allow users to connect in a way that most social networks don’t offer: based on how similarly you think. CoRank’s new version will allow people to create specialized, topical versions of that concept. So, for example, I could create a movie news site that would allow people to connect with other, like minded movie geeks. Beyond just sharing a love of movies, CoRank’s tools would allow users to find people who actually share a similar outlook on the film industry.What do you think? Is there a place for branded, topical social news and bookmarking sites? josh catone 1 Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

ACA Emergency Services Rules Clarified (T.D. 9744)

first_imgLogin to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative. The federal government clarified emergency services rules under the the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). The government clarified the rules, which were issued in 2015, after the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) challenged them. Among other things, ACEP argued that the federal government did not adequately respond to their public comments on the regulations. On August 31, 2017, the court sent the matter back to the government to respond to the ACEP’s comments.Emergency Services RulesUnder the 2015 final regulations a plan or policy satisfies the copayment and coinsurance limitations when it provides benefits for out-of-network emergency services in an amount equal to the greatest of:(1) The amount negotiated with in-network providers for the emergency service furnished;(2) The amount calculated using the same method the plan generally uses to determine payments for out-of-network services (such as the usual, customary, and reasonable charges) but substituting the in-network cost-sharing provisions for the out-of-network cost sharing provisions; or(3) The amount paid under Medicare for the emergency service.Each of these three amounts is calculated excluding any in-network copayment or coinsurance imposed on the patient. This is sometimes referred to as the “Greatest of Three” or the “GOT” regulation because it sets a floor on the amount nongrandfathered group health plans and health insurance issuers offering nongrandfathered group or individual health insurance coverage are required to pay for out-of-network emergency services under this provision at the greatest of the three listed amounts.ClarificationIn its clarification, the government stated that the regulations provide a reasonable and transparent method for determining appropriate payments by nongrandfathered group health plans and health insurance issuers offering nongrandfathered group or individual health insurance coverage for out-of-network emergency services. In addition, the Departments maintain that ACEP and other commentators did not provide adequate information to support their assertion that the methods used for determining the minimum payment for out-of-network emergency services under the GOT regulation are not sufficiently transparent or reasonable.last_img read more

Should you get your pet’s DNA tested? Scientists urge caution

first_img E.K.: Dogs and humans are very similar to one another, so you can use the same technology to look at dog DNA or human DNA. With these direct to consumer tests, for dogs or humans, often you’re not looking at every single part of the genome. You’re just looking for changes, or mutations, that are linked to some kind of disease or condition.Q: How accurate are the tests for dogs that are now on the market?E.K.: With genetic tests for humans, there have been so many studies that look at whether or not a certain mutation in your genes actually leads to you developing a certain disease. There just isn’t this massive body of work on dog genomes. So many of these tests are telling owners that their dog could get a certain disease without any major studies on how likely that is to happen. The science needs to catch up.Q: What are the dangers of potentially inaccurate test results?L.M.: In my veterinary practice, I’ve seen more and more people coming in with results that show their dog has a chance of developing conditions like epilepsy, heart disease, and degenerative muscular disorders, and they want to make treatment decisions right away. They’re ready to pay for more tests or medical interventions that the dog might not actually need, that could be quite expensive, and that could be invasive for the dog. In some cases, people preemptively end their dog’s life if they think their dog is predisposed to a degenerative disease, because don’t they want their pet to suffer.Q: Genetic testing kits for humans are regulated. Why aren’t pet tests? GIL COHEN MAGEN/REUTERS/Newscom Should you get your pet’s DNA tested? Scientists urge caution You’ve probably seen an ad for a company that wants to tell you about your genome. Just spit in a tube, send it in, and you can learn about your disease risk.Now, you can do the same for your pets, at least according to nearly a dozen—and growing—companies on the market. But how accurate are these tests—and why are these businesses not subject to the same regulations as those that analyze human DNA?Science chatted with Lisa Moses, a veterinarian affiliated with Harvard Medical School in Boston, and Elinor Karlsson, director of vertebrate genomics at the  Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Both are authors on an opinion piece published today in Nature about these and other potential issues with the booming pet genomics industry. This interview has been edited for clarity and length.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Q: What kind of pets are being tested?Lisa Moses: It’s overwhelmingly dogs. There are some tests for cats, but right now it’s about 90% dogs.Q: Why would an owner want to get their pet’s DNA tested?Elinor Karlsson: A lot of dog owners are interested in what breeds are in their dog, or some fun facts, like how big their dog could get. But there’s also testing for somewhere between 100 and 200 different genetic variants that have been linked to disease.Q: Is the process of testing a dog’s DNA different from testing a human’s? A sample of dog saliva contains enough DNA for a genetic test. Veterinarian and researcher Lisa Moses L.M.: With any new technology, regulation often lags behind, and for humans, there’s been more time for conversations to take place, and rules have been established that govern how the tests are vetted. With veterinary medicine, there hasn’t been a formal and systematic discussion about the ethics related to these new technologies. We need to start talking about this, because right now a lot of people are in the dark.Q: What might happen if this industry continues to go unregulated?L.M.: I worry that if the tests don’t improve, people are going to notice that their dogs don’t actually get the diseases they’re at risk for. I don’t want people to lose the idea that there is tremendous value in genetic testing, if we do it right. We really do have the potential to figure out that our patients get diseases long before they do permanent damage, if we are able to make this happen.Q: How can we improve genetic testing for pets?L.M.: We need to start with a conversation that encompasses the international veterinary community, the testing industry, and the scientists. We have to come up with some mutually agreed upon ways to report these results, and figure out how to validate them. We’d need to have transparency on how the tests are done, how the science is done, and talk seriously about data sharing. There’s a consortium, the International Partnership for Dogs, and they’re trying to do some standardization and data sharing. But, it’s brand new and I don’t know yet how successful they’re going to be.Q: What kind of things could we learn from pet genetics, if we do it right?E.K.: Dogs carry a lot of the same diseases humans do. By studying dogs, we could learn a lot about the causes of things like cancer, or diabetes, and use that information to develop new treatments for humans. By Frankie SchembriJul. 25, 2018 , 1:00 PM Evolutionary biologist Elinor Karlsson Michael J. Butts Lisa Moses last_img read more