Town Center Debuts at Disney Springs

first_imgShare This!©Rikki NiblettIt’s been three years, but we finally have another large piece of the Disney Springs puzzle. Yesterday, the Town Center debuted with many new shops, restaurants, and entertainment. A grand total of 23 new shops and seven restaurants opened with lots of fanfare.Here’s a look at some of the great new options you’ll get to experience on your next vacation.ALEX AND ANIAmerican ThreadsAmorette’s PatisserieB. B. Wolf’s Sausage Co.D-Luxe BurgerEdward BeinerEverything But Waterfrancesca’sJohnston & Murphykate spade new yorkKiplingL’Occitane en ProvenceLucky BrandMAC CosmeticsMelissa ShoesMorimoto Asia Street FoodNa HokuPANDORASephoraSperrySprinklesThe Daily PoutineTommy BahamaUGGUnder Armour Brand HouseUNOde50Vera BradleyVolcomYeSakeZARAMore shops and restaurants will open by the end of the month at Disney Springs. They are:AristocrepesLilly PulitzerTROPHY ROOMSTK OrlandoAlso, many other locations are expected to open in the Town Center at Disney Springs at various times this summer. They include:AnthropologieBlaze Fast-Fire’d PizzaCoca-Cola Store and Rooftop Beverage BarColumbia SportswearFree PeopleFrontera CocinaHomecoming – Florida Kitchen and Shine BarJohnny WasLACOSTELuxury of Time by Diamonds InternationalOakleyShoreUNIQLOVince CamutoIn addition, Guest Relations has moved from both the Marketplace and the West Side and now there is one location for Guests to stop. The Welcome Center, which is the new home for Guest Relations at Disney Springs that will continue to offer a wealth of services including theme park and Cirque du Soleil ticket sales, Disney dining and resort reservations, information for guests with disabilities, foreign currency exchanges, and other general assistance items.For those looking for parking, you’ll now have the ability to park in the Lime Garage!  This new garage offers Guests convenient parking access to both the Disney Springs Town Center and the Marketplace. This new garage will also use smart technology to identify open parking spaces. In addition, access to Disney Springs is now easier, as the roadway improvements on Buena Vista Drive are nearly complete. Guests will have access to additional car lanes and new dedicated bus lanes now operational.Of course, things are constantly changing at Disney Springs, and it was just announced a few new shops that will be on their way to Disney Springs. They are:Origins: A skincare retailer featuring products formulated with certified organic ingredients and 100 percent natural essential oils.Sugarboo & Co.: Offers artful prints, home goods, paper products, accessories and more.Superdry: Focusing on clothing with designs that fuse vintage Americana and Japanese-inspired graphics with a British style.TUMI: A leading global brand of premium travel, business and lifestyle accessories.I’ll make sure to keep you posted on all the changes going on with Disney Springs! Stay tuned!last_img read more

Neotel launches home phone service

first_imgPrice differentiator 23 October 2008 “We believe that we have hit the nail on the head with this product, particularly in light of the current economic conditions,” Neotel Consumer Business Unit head Mukul Sharma said in a statement this week. According to Neotel, a key differentiator of the company’s home phone offering is the call rates. “During the course of 24 months, a usage discount of up to R25 will be given back to the consumer every month,” Sharma said. “This effectively means that consumers could be reimbursed for the full purchase price of the phone.” “This eliminates the risk of losing your service due to copper [cable] theft.” Two packages There is no differentiation between Neotel-to-Neotel peak and off peak rates, which are charged at 17 cents per minute for local calls at all times. Both packages operate on true per-second billing for all calls, from the first second onwards. SAinfo reporter Neotel’s home phone is available in two packages, the first of which allows the consumer to purchase the phone upfront for R599, followed by a monthly service fee of R99. “While the product focuses on providing consumers with high-quality voice, they also have the option of utilising data, sms and e-mail, which is provided as part of the service,” Sharma said, adding that a further benefit of Neotel’s home phone was that the service was delivered via a fixed-wireless product. The second package does not require an upfront payment for the phone, and is charged at R199 per month. “Consumers are feeling the pinch of global and local economic pressures and are continuously looking to save costs, but still stay in touch. “At 34 cents per minute for local peak landline calls, and 17 cents per minute for local off-peak landline calls, communicating will become more affordable for the consumer,” Sharma said. Neotel has launched a home phone service in South Africa’s major metropolitan areas, making use of the company’s fixed-wireless network – with local peak rates to all landlines set at almost half the price consumers are currently paying. “Neotel’s home phone is a home phone that offers impeccable voice quality, delivery within 48 hours of successful order completion and no installation required,” he said. “On this package, users receive 1 000 free Neotel-to-Neotel minutes and 200 free sms within Neotel’s coverage area, [with] the free minutes [being] applicable for local, regional and national calls,” Sharma said. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Cheap plastic film cools whatever it touches up to 10°C

first_img Glass spheres in a plastic film strongly emit infrared light, cooling objects below. Large-scale film cools objects on which it sits. Cheap plastic film cools whatever it touches up to 10°C If heat is not your thing, rejoice: A thin plastic sheet may soon provide some relief from the intense summer sun. The film, made from transparent plastic embedded with tiny glass spheres, absorbs almost no visible light, yet pulls in heat from any surface it touches. Already, the new material, when combined with a mirrorlike silver film, has been shown to cool whatever it sits on by as much as 10°C. And because it can be made cheaply at high volumes, it could be used to passively cool buildings and electronics such as solar cells, which work more efficiently at lower temperatures.During the day most materials—concrete, asphalt, metals, and even people—absorb visible and near-infrared (IR) light from the sun. That added energy excites molecules, which warm up and, over time, emit the energy back out as photons with longer wavelengths, typically in the midrange of the infrared spectrum. That helps the materials cool back down, particularly at night when they are no longer absorbing visible light but are still radiating IR photons.In recent years, researchers have tried to goose this “passive cooling” effect by making materials that absorb as little visible light as possible yet continue to emit mid-IR light. In 2014, for example, researchers led by Shanhui Fan, an electrical engineer at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, created a sandwichlike film of silicon dioxide (glass) and hafnium dioxide that reflected almost all the light that hit it while strongly emitting mid-IR light, a combination that allowed it to cool surfaces by as much as 5°C. Still, Fan and his colleagues had to use clean room technology to make their films, a costly process that doesn’t work well on a large scale. By Robert F. ServiceFeb. 9, 2017 , 2:00 PMcenter_img Y. Zhai et al., Science 355, 6325 (9 February 2017) Y. Zhai et al., Science 355, 6325 (9 February 2017) When Xiaobo Yin, a materials scientist at the University of Colorado in Boulder, saw Fan’s paper, he noticed the material worked in part by encouraging infrared photons to bounce back and forth between the layers of the film in a manner that made it a stronger IR emitter. Yin wondered whether there was a simpler way to do this. From previous work, Yin knew that spherical objects can act like tiny resonance chambers—much as the sound box of a guitar encourages sound waves of a particular frequency to bounce back and forth inside. He and his colleagues calculated that glass beads about 8 micrometers in diameter—little bigger than a red blood cell—would make powerful IR resonators and thus strong IR emitters.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)So they bought a batch of glass powder from a commercial supplier and mixed it with the starting material for a transparent plastic called polymethylpentene. They then formed their material into 300-millimeter-wide sheets and backed them with a thin mirrorlike coating of silver. When laid across objects in the midday sun, the bottom layer of silver reflected almost all the visible light that hit it: The film absorbed only about 4% of incoming photons. At the same time, the film sucked heat out of whatever surface it was sitting on and radiated that energy at a mid-IR frequency of 10 micrometers. Because few air molecules absorb IR at that frequency, the radiation drifts into empty space without warming the air or the surrounding materials, causing the objects below to cool by as much as 10°C. Just as important, Yin notes that the new film can be made in a roll-to-roll setup for a cost of only $0.25 to $0.50 per square meter.“This is very nice work demonstrating a pathway toward large-scale applications of the concept of radiative cooling,” says Fan, who did not work on the current project. Yin says that he and his colleagues are already working on one such application, chilling water that could then be used to cool buildings and other large structures. That could be particularly useful in electricity-generating power plants, where cooling water even a few degrees can increase energy production efficiency by a percentage point or two, a “big gain,” Yin says. And without the silver backing, he adds, the plastic film could also increase the power generation from solar cells, which operate more efficiently at lower temperatures.last_img read more